Melanoma Monday is May4, 2015 Because we love your skin, Orlando Cosmetic Surgery believes it is appropriate to remind you about an important day coming in May.

May fourth is Melanoma Monday. We hope you are aware of the risks of melanoma all year round, but having a special awareness day is very important. On this day of advocacy, charity and awareness, we support countless other organizations in the hope of raising public consciousness concerning this deadly disease.

The doctors and staff of Orlando Cosmetic Surgery recognize that “The aim of Melanoma Monday is to raise awareness about melanoma.  Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer in which cells within moles on the skin becoming malignant (cancerous) and can spread rapidly to other areas of the body if left untreated.”

A Look at the Numbers:

The American Cancer Society’s has estimated that 73,870 new melanomas will be discovered in the United States during the days of 2015. They believe that about 42,670 cases will be men, and 31,200 in women.

About 9,940 people are expected to die of melanoma during 2015.

They have also reported that the rates of melanoma have been on the rise for 30 years. Find out more about the facts and statistics at this user-friendly resource.

A Look at Your Risks:

In honor of Melanoma Monday, let’s take a look at some significant facts regarding melanoma and your risks. Keep in mind that you can prevent some of these risks, such as harmful exposure to the sun.

1. There are many types of skin cancer, but melanoma is the most deadly. It causes 75 per cent of all skin cancer deaths.Orlando Cosmetic Surgery Reminder:  Check yourself for melanoma.

2. Melanomas can develop any where on your skin surface, as well as in many areas of the body such as the eye, underneath nails and inside the nose and mouth. You need to check the entire surface of your skin periodically and tell your doctor about suspicious moles.

3. If you are fair-skinned, it means you have less protection from UV radiation. According to the Mayo Clinic experts, “If you have blond or red hair, light-colored eyes, and freckle or sunburn easily, you’re more likely to develop melanoma than is someone with a darker complexion. But melanoma can develop in people with darker complexions, including Hispanics and blacks.” (It can even be discovered under a fingernail or in the eye.

2. Genetic Risk:  You should be aware that a high risk for melanoma can be genetically passed or inherited. Orlando Cosmetic Surgery is using awareness of Melanoma Monday to urge you to check your family history.

Your risk of developing a melanoma is greater if you have a close family member who has been given a melanoma diagnosis.

3. Your Sunshine History:  If you endured strong, blistering sunburn as a child, you are in a high risk group for adult melanoma. Find out more about your risks, and how to deal with melanoma at this informative online source.

4. Run Away from Sunbathing: In any form, sun bathing is risky. At Orlando Cosmetic Surgery, we highly discourage exposing the skin to sun or to any form of indoor tanning.

The American Academy of Dermatology has stated that the use of indoor tanning beds elevates the risk of getting melanoma by 75 percent.

Likewise, the scientists at skin cancer.org have proven that “Just one indoor UV tanning session increases users’ chances of developing melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer—by 20 percent.”

Be aware of melanoma.  Black ribbon symbolizes Melanoma Monday. New Hope on the Horizon:

If you have children, or simply if you love children, you will be delighted to know that the melanoma rates for children have been significantly reduced over the last few years as evidenced by a brand new article in Plastic Surgery Practice. You can check out the numbers at this reliable online resource.

The study yields positive proof that public awareness and better sun protection, as well as more treatments, are improving the diagnosis and survival rates of melanoma.

By the way, the word “melanoma” means black tumor, so it is fitting that the colored ribbons Orlando Cosmetic Surgery will be wearing on Melanoma Monday will be black.